JOUR315 Assessment Task 3

Please note: the spacing of the paragraphs in the blog are out of my control. I’ve attempted to fix the issue several times, but WordPress keeps formatting it differently.

Introduction

When a Wollongong tavern was named in a list of the 48 most violent pubs in the state at the end of last year, it was a simple confirmation for many residents who were all too familiar with the hostility. The industrial city’s nightlife had concealed a certain notoriety for well over a decade; it seemed until now, it would continue unchallenged.

Despite the longevity of the problem, the list is one aspect of a cohesive effort aimed at cracking down on alcohol-related violence in the Illawarra.

As journalist Sam Hall investigates, different sectors of the community have united in an effort to change the culture of Wollongong nightlife and break the cycle of regular violence occurring in larger, corporate-owned venues.

Grab/Voiceover Overlay/Vision
V/O: It’s an issue that’s plagued the Illawarra for decades – on a Friday or Saturday night, revellers from around the region flock to the Wollongong CBD for a night on the town… 

What starts out as a fun-filled evening often ends in tragedy.

 

Intoxicated patrons become taken over by rage, causing damage to themselves and to those around them.

 

TAKE GRAB

DAVID CAMPBELL: I HAVE NO DOUBT THAT AS A SOCIETY, WE HAVE TO SAY TO OURSELVES WHETHER WERE YOUNG OR OLDER THAT BEING ABSOLUTELY DRUNK IN A PUBLIC PLACE AND CAUSING GREIF IS NOT ON.

 

In two thousand and eight, Wollongong City Council released a late night development control plan, revealing some staggering police figures.

 

GRAPHIC:

47% of assaults, 44% of brawls and 77% of robberies occurred in close proximity to the major pubs and clubs.

 

More than a quarter of all reported incidents in the Crown Street Mall occur on a Saturday or Sunday night, between the hours of 11 pm and 5 am.

 

The DCP highlighted a need for a more effective approach to the Responsible Service of Alcohol in particular venues.

 

TAKE GRAB

DAVID CAMPBELL: THE INDIVIDUAL LICENSEE HAS THE ABILITY TO SET THE TONE IN THEIR LICENSED PREMISES. THEY CAN DO THAT BY THE STAFF THEY EMPLOY, THEY CAN DO THAT BY ENSURING THEY COMPLY WITH THE LEGISLATION THAT SAYS THAT THEY CAN’T SERVE ALCOHOL TO SOMEONE WHO IS SO OBVIOUSLY DRUNK.

 

That legislation became a whole lot tougher for the Glasshouse Tavern, after its inclusion in New South Wales Premier Nathan Rees’ violent pub list.

 

The refined laws now enforce a 2am lockout time, plastic cups after midnight, restrictions on the number of drinks bought after 12am and the ceasing of alcohol service 30 minutes before closing.

 

In addition, Closed Circuit Television cameras are now strategically placed throughout the city, and they’re being put to good use.

 

TAKE GRAB

PAUL FANNING

CCTV ITSELF HAS BEEN EFFECTIVE AS ONE PARTICULAR TOOL. TO GIVE YOU AN INSTANCE, WE’RE LOOKING JANUARY 2007 TO NOW, WE’VE MADE 1061 ARRESTS SINCE THE INCEPTION  OF THE CAMERAS.  

 

158 cameras are now situated between the entertainment centre and the hospital.

 

But according to many, the critical factor in this fight against crime is the licensees.

 

The newest proprietor to the Illawarra aims to change the culture of Wollongong nightlife by making his venue as safe as possible.

 

TAKE GRAB

ANU KOTAGAMA

I THINK WELL SEVENTEEN YEARS WORKING IN THE INDUSTRY WOLLONGONG AND NEWCASTLE HAS HAD A HISTORY OF PROBLEMS, MORE SO IN THE RECENT PAST. WE’RE TRIED TO TACKLE THAT AND MY PERSONAL OPINION IS “IT SHOULDN’T BE THE CASE.”

 

Kotagama believes  that with seasoned staff, better security and the use of strict venue policy, his venue is like a safe haven for pub goers.

 

The commerce graduate says he is prepared  to sit down with other licensees in order to stop the violence.

 

It seems the focus now has been placed in the hands of the patron.

 

This is Sam Hall reporting for the university.

0:00 – 0:07 Pan of Glasshouse entrance. Tells the viewer the focus of alcohol related violence in the Illawarra. 

0:07 – 0:13 Close-up of security guards.

 

0:13 – 0:18 Shot of beer tap through schooner glass. Deliberately blurred to portray how a night can turn sour after excessive alcohol.

 

0:18 – 0:21 Still shot of alcohol warning poster.

 

0:21 – 0:35 Grab

 

 

 

 

 

 

0:35 – 0:39 – Still shot of signage out the front of the Harp. Signifies how seriously the matter is being taken by some venues.

0:39 – 0:42 – Zoom out from beer taps.

 0:42 – 0:59 Graphic; an effective yet simple way for the reader to digest all of the information. 

 

 

1:00 – Hand-held walking pan of liquor bottles. Highlights the importance of RSA and what is being said by journalist. Deliberately go over grab to keep the audience interested.

 

 

1:10 – 1:22 Grab

 

  1:22 – 1:29 Pan of bottles

 

1:29 – 1:33 External shot of Glasshouse Tavern during the day.

 

 

 1:33 – 1:43 Graphic

 

 

 1:43 – 1:46 Still shot of CCTV warning sign.

 

1:46 – 1:49 Tilt from cameras to the Harp Hotel. Emphasises the purpose of the cameras in relation to late night violence.

 

1:49 – 2:02 Grab

 

 

 

2:02 – 2:06 Tilt from Wollongong street up to CCTV cameras.

 

2:06 – 2:13 Tilt from camera warning sign to Glasshouse Tavern. Emphasises purpose of the cameras in relation to late night violence.

 

2:13 – 2:21 A selection of still photos from within HostageX nightclub. The photos used were supplied to me by the owner with his full permission. I was not allowed to take photos inside so I decided this would be the best way to portray the venue in its live form.

 

2:21 – 2:36 Grab

 

 

 

 

2:36 – 2:44 – Pan of beer taps

 

  

2:44 – 2:51 Daytime pan of the Glasshouse Tavern.

 2:51 – 2:59 – Still shot of patrons out the front of the Harp Hotel. Highlights the message that the power is now up to people like them. Patrons need to think more strongly about how they act in public.

 

 

 

 

Process:

The process of putting this piece together was very satisfying and enjoyable. When I first pitched the idea at the beginning of the session, I knew that I had a lot of hard work ahead  of me in order to complete the task properly. The verdict of my script was that it “had  some significant research put into it… [And] there was a lot of work to be done in tracking down compliant talent and willing politicians.” Taking on this advice, I set out early to ask potential talent; it was the fact that I did it so early in the session that I was able to complete the story with time to spare.

In terms of issue I had to overcome, I think the fact that so much ‘red tape’ evolved around this story meant that it couldn’t be simply done in a couple of hours. Each of my talent wanted to know exactly what my intentions were with the story, because their opinions could pose dire consequences if I portrayed them in the wrong way. Again, this came down to a time factor thing. Giving people plenty of time to work with made it possible for me to comfortably reassure them about the intentions of the task. This cannot be said for all parties involved. I got caught in a verbal stoush when three bouncers approached me whilst filming out the front of the Glasshouse Tavern. The biggest lesson this taught me is that a journalist should really know the tools of his/her trade; that is, they should know their legal rights, responsibilities and obligations. On the night, I was prepared enough to spin off enough legal and ethical jargon to get me out of trouble. If this had not been the case, I fear the ignorance and distorted assumptions shared by the bouncers would have become much more evident.

The process of editing this piece was a lot easier than the second assessment. This is due largely to the fact that I had some hands-on experience under my belt. With this in mind, I was able to focus more on the creative elements of the piece rather than making sure I’d put it all together properly.

Another hurdle for this piece was the varying degree of media experience each of my talent possessed. On one extreme is David Campbell, the man who can get his way out of a tricky situation posed by even the most experienced journalist. He knows the physical process of shooting a television interview, even to the extent he had a piece of paper ready to get a ‘white balance.’ On the other end of the scale was club owner Anu Kotagama, who was very much the opposite. Trying to keep Anu in frame during the interview was a difficult task, which explains why much of the interview wasn’t framed properly. If he detected me trying adjust the camera, it would take away from his ‘train of thought’ and he would lose focus midway through a grab. I think the best solution here is to have someone who can operate a camera to keep the talent in frame.

I think using a voiceover for this piece was a much more effective and elaborate way of depicting the story. I think the issue though was the technical side of the putting down your voice. I struggled a lot with the equipment, because of troubles with my voice ‘popping.’ Having a thin layer of material between the microphone and the narrator, like those used in professional editing suites, would eliminate most of the popping.

Overall, this assignment was very positive. With such a hands-on approach to the convergent theories, it has been a great way to develop my skills and improve my overall ability.

Newsworthiness/News Values:

In reference to The Daily Miracle, An Introduction to Journalism (Conley and Lamble, 2006), I believe this convergence piece meets the following criteria in terms of newsworthiness.

Impact: Because this story is one that most people in the Illawarra or even New South Wales can relate to, it creates instant impact. The first few shots are what people often identify as a traditional pub entrance, where a lot of violence can occur. This is designed to grab the audiences’ attention straight away. This story gives scope to the people who dismiss that nothing is being done to curb alcohol-related violence.

Conflict: The nature of the scenario immediately points a finger to Police, Government, licensing agencies and proprietors throughout the Illawarra. The public demand answers for these sort of issues; straightaway the story introduces conflict.

Timeliness: Given Australia’s predicament surrounding binge drinking as well as Nathan Rees’ lashing of the Glasshouse, this story has huge timeliness.

There is always an ongoing angle that would suitable for this story, meaning it would never be ‘old news.’

On a local scale, the council is still in the process of deciding whether to enforce 2am lockout times for takeaway food outlets in Crown Street Mall.

Proximity: For Illawarra audiences, this story is literally under their noses. Wollongong is constantly a source of alcohol-related violence with revellers travelling from throughout the region to go out in popular hotspots (primarily Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday). The story would have relevance indeed throughout the state because there are another 40 odd establishments named in Nathan Rees’ list that aren’t located in the Illawarra.

Currency: Issues involving binge drinking and alcohol-related violence hold immense currency to all Australians. Things such as the ongoing ‘alcopops’ debate hold significant interest among the public – this story is a definitive angle of a common trouble. The governments ‘war on alcopops’ has become a living entity for anyone in Australia, so any story that is relevant will create interest.

Human interest: Using Anu Kotagama and portraying his personal wish of changing the culture of Wollongong nightlife is very much a strong human interest angle. It shows the audience that not every venue owner is the same; here is their chance to meet someone who is actually looking out for the safety of his patrons.

Prominence: By introducing politicians and authorities into the raging nightlife debate, the story immediately becomes prominent. Having David Campbell, a highly regard politician, thrusts this piece into the limelight and gives backbone to the statement that people are sick of the notoriety of Wollongong’s nightlife. Having someone from the other side of the debate, a pub owner, also gives the piece prominence and balances out the argument.

The unusual: Is this violence in pubs an unusual kind of script? No. For anyone that goes out regularly, they know exactly what can happen when alcohol related violence takes place. For many people who aren’t in this age bracket, this kind of story would be alarmingly unusual. For example, older men might find the fact that people glass one another horrifying; back when they got into scuffles at the pub, it was all fist fights. Given that what happens in Wollongong doesn’t defy current trends, this biggest weakness in this pitch, in terms of news value, would have to be ‘the unusual.’

Turn Site Previews Off

 Voiceover script

It’s an issue that’s plagued the Illawarra for decades – on a Friday or Saturday night, revellers from around the region flock to the Wollongong CBD for a night on the town…

 

What starts out as a fun-filled evening often ends in tragedy.

 

Intoxicated patrons become taken over by rage, causing damage to themselves and to those around them.

 

TAKE GRAB

DAVID CAMPBELL: I HAVE NO DOUBT THAT AS A SOCIETY, WE HAVE TO SAY TO OURSELVES WHETHER WERE YOUNG OR OLDER THAT BEING ABSOLUTELY DRUNK IN A PUBLIC PLACE AND CAUSING GREIF IS NOT ON.

 

In two thousand and eight, Wollongong City Council released a late night development control plan, revealing some staggering police figures.

 

GRAPHIC:

47% of assaults, 44% of brawls and 77% of robberies occurred in close proximity to the major pubs and clubs.

 

More than a quarter of all reported incidents in the Crown Street Mall occur on a Saturday or Sunday night, between the hours of 11 pm and 5 am.

 

The DCP highlighted a need for a more effective approach to the Responsible Service of Alcohol in particular venues.

 

TAKE GRAB

DAVID CAMPBELL: THE INDIVIDUAL LICENSEE HAS THE ABILITY TO SET THE TONE IN THEIR LICENSED PREMISES. THEY CAN DO THAT BY THE STAFF THEY EMPLOY, THEY CAN DO THAT BY ENSURING THEY COMPLY WITH THE LEGISLATION THAT SAYS THAT THEY CAN’T SERVE ALCOHOL TO SOMEONE WHO IS SO OBVIOUSLY DRUNK.

 

That legislation became a whole lot tougher for the Glasshouse Tavern, after its inclusion in New South Wales Premier Nathan Rees’ violent pub list.

 

The refined laws now enforce a 2am lockout time, plastic cups after midnight, restrictions on the number of drinks bought after 12am and the ceasing of alcohol service 30 minutes before closing.

 

In addition, Closed Circuit Television cameras are now strategically placed throughout the city, and they’re being put to good use.

 

TAKE GRAB

PAUL FANNING

CCTV ITSELF HAS BEEN EFFECTIVE AS ONE PARTICULAR TOOL. TO GIVE YOU AN INSTANCE, WE’RE LOOKING JANUARY 2007 TO NOW, WE’VE MADE 1061 ARRESTS SINCE THE INCEPTION OF THE CAMERAS.  

 158 cameras are now situated between the entertainment centre and the hospital.

 But according to many, the critical factor in this fight against crime is the licensees.

 The newest proprietor to the Illawarra aims to change the culture of Wollongong nightlife by making his venue as safe as possible.

 TAKE GRAB

ANU KOTAGAMA

I THINK WELL SEVENTEEN YEARS WORKING IN THE INDUSTRY WOLLONGONG AND NEWCASTLE HAS HAD A HISTORY OF PROBLEMS, MORE SO IN THE RECENT PAST. WE’RE TRIED TO TACKLE THAT AND MY PERSONAL OPINION IS “IT SHOULDN’T BE THE CASE.”

 Kotagama believes that with seasoned staff, better security and the use of strict venue policy, his venue is like a safe haven for pub goers.

 The commerce graduate says he is prepared to sit down with other licensees in order to stop the violence.

 It seems the focus now has been placed in the hands of the patron.

 This is Sam Hall reporting for the university.

(End story) 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: